Greg Lassonde, CFRE, is principal of Legacy Program Specialists, launched in 2007 to help build, sustain, and audit legacy giving programs. He has since built a diverse client base of more than sixty organizations.

He has been working in legacy giving since 1992. He started his career as a fund development staffer in 1982, working with nonprofits including KPFA Radio and the San Francisco Symphony.

Greg speaks frequently throughout the United States on legacy giving.

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Planned Giving is Dead. Long Live Legacy Giving – Part 3

In his three-part article series, Greg Lassonde discusses the paradigm shift from “planned giving” to “legacy giving.” As you’ll see, the implications are far more significant for fundraising success than a mere change in terminology. In this Part 3, Greg explains the shift in thinking about what to measure and how to measure it. He talks about the changing makeup and role of committees. He then turns his attention to the question of just who we practitioners are, professionally, in the new paradigm, and offers his perspective on needed changes to strengthen the profession.

Planned Giving is Dead. Long Live Legacy Giving – Part 2

In this Part 2, Greg turns to a remarkable shift by nonprofits in hiring criteria for recruitment of fund development staff who will be interfacing with supporters with the goal of facilitating legacy giving, and discusses the broadening out of staff and volunteer roles in moving the process along. He also looks at the change in thinking about identifying prospects, how leads are qualified, and how to go about asking for a legacy gift. He even discusses the new lexicon created to better describe the legacy giving paradigm.

Planned Giving is Dead. Long Live Legacy Giving – Part 1

In his three-part article series, Greg Lassonde discusses the paradigm shift from “planned giving” to “legacy giving.” As you’ll see, the implications are far more significant for fundraising success than a mere change in terminology. In this Part 1, Greg describes the old paradigm where development offices were inwardly focused, where even the name “planned giving” looked to the organization’s interests but not to those of the organization’s supporters. He then shows the evolution in thinking about the relative value of types of gifts brought about by the paradigm shift.